Tag Archives: plumpy’nut

South Sudan: life-saving food for children is looted

As the war continues in South Sudan, children are suffering on a daily basis. Even if they escape the violence, they are at risk of deadly malnutrition because of food shortages.

Read the full article at Examiner.

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Save the Children’s plumpy plan to fight hunger

Afghanistan, South Sudan, Central African Republic, and Somalia are just some of the countries that live constantly on the brink of famine. Children are threatened with malnutrition on a daily basis.

Read the full article at Examiner.

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Saving the children in Darfur, Sudan

Darfur and Sudan will not escape the legacy of war and poverty with its children suffering from hunger. The statistics on malnutrition in the country are staggering.

Read the article at Examiner.

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UNICEF a life-saver for Syrian children

The civil war in Syria is now in its 4th year, and everyday unfolds a struggle to survive for millions trapped in the country. War causes food shortages and malnutrition.

Read the full article at Examiner.

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The Granola Bar that Saves Children’s Lives

 

This Bar Saves Lives

This Bar Saves Lives

Halloween is sneaking up on us. The holidays are not far behind. These days come with plenty of snacks with chocolate, vanilla and many other kinds of flavors.

What if you could buy a snack and save a life at the same time? What if on Halloween or Thanksgiving you could share the joy and feed a “silent guest,” a starving child a world away?

There actually is a way with This Bar Saves Lives, a new granola bar with chocolate, vanilla and wild blueberry flavors. Each purchase of this bar means a donation of the miracle food Plumpy’Nut, a peanut paste fed to children suffering from severe malnutrition.

Ryan Devlin, Todd Grinnell and Ravi Patel started This Bar Saves Lives when they witnessed the devastating effects of child malnutrition. When you buy one of these bars the donation gets sent to Edesia, a Plumpy’Nut producer in Providence, Rhode Island. Edesia makes the Plumpy’Nut and sends it to Save the Children, which uses this food in their relief missions around the world. Save the Children says “more than 150 million children in developing countries are malnourished.”

Malnutrition can cause lasting physical and mental damage in small children under the age of five. If the malnutrition become severe children may perish. In many developing countries afflicted by war, disasters or extreme poverty, small children are vulnerable to malnutrition. When food supply systems break down in a country, families can be forced into desperation with little rations. They look to humanitarian aid agencies for help. Plumpy’Nut can rescue the smallest children, if there is enough supply on hand for aid groups.

Within the last year Save the Children has been fighting child malnutrition in South Sudan. In Eastern Equatoria, a state in South Sudan, crops had failed and families were resorting to wild fruits to survive. More cases of malnutrition had to be treated at Save the Children health centers there. Plumpy’Nut was used for the most severe cases.

Conflict in Jonglei, South Sudan also has escalated malnutrition among children thus increasing the need for Plumpy”nut.

When funding is low aid groups like Save the Children may be forced to cut back on this life-saving food. The consequences are devastating. Opportunities like This Bar Saves Lives gives people a world away a chance to help.

Just as after World War II when Americans fed “silent guest” at their Holiday meals, you can be doing the same in the coming weeks and months. Your “silent guest” might be a child in drought-stricken West Africa, or in war-devastated Syria or Mali. You can help them get the Plumpy’Nut that will save their lives.

Visit their web site at www.thisbarsaveslives.com

A note from This Bar Saves Lives: “Whether it’s setting up Hunger Awareness Campaigns on your campus, holding a This Bar Saves Lives community event, or connecting us with your company, there are a number of ways to get involved. Jump in!

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This Mother’s Day, Help Save a Child’s Life

A mother attends to her severely malnourished child at an inpatient feeding centre in Mao, Chad. Plumpy'Nut is used to treat this potentially deadly condition (UNICEF Chad/2011/ Esteve)

A mother attends to her severely malnourished child at an inpatient feeding centre in Mao, Chad. Plumpy’Nut is used to treat this potentially deadly condition (UNICEF Chad/2011/ Esteve)

For Mother’s Day we can make a difference for the millions of hungry children around the world who struggle to survive the first 1000 days of life. As Herbert Hoover once said about the tragedy of hunger, it “sits beside every anxious mother three times each day.”

Infants caught in war, disaster and poverty zones in Afghanistan, Haiti, Yemen, Syria, Mali, South Sudan, Pakistan and other nations often do not get access to the nutrition that they need.

When this happens, they suffer lasting physical or mental damage, or even death.

UNICEF said in a recent report, “Globally, about one in four children under five years old are stunted.” Generation after generation in these countries are stunted in growth and mind.

If the hunger-afflicted nations had enough supply of the miracle food Plumpy’Nut we could stabilize the malnutrition emergency, and save a generation. Only then, with healthy children, can a nation develop the longer-term solutions to hunger and poverty.

On this Mother’s Day remember the millions of infants around the world who just need these 33- cent packets of food to avoid the potential catastrophe in those early years.

Providence-based Edesia, UNICEF and Save the Children are some of the charities that need donations to buy Plumpy’Nut. Millions of children and their mothers can be spared the tragedy of hunger and malnutrition.

That is the gift they need most of all.

Originally published at Cincinnati.com

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Saving the Children in South Sudan

Save the Children is treating severely malnourished infants at its nutrition centers in Eastern Equatoria and Jonglei, two states in South Sudan suffering from hunger emergencies. (Save the Children photo)

Save the Children is treating severely malnourished infants at its nutrition centers in Eastern Equatoria and Jonglei, two states in South Sudan suffering from hunger emergencies. (Save the Children photo)

Save the Children staff knew something was wrong. It was last November in Eastern Equatoria of South Sudan, just after the harvest, when it was less likely for families to need food assistance. Malnourished children were still being brought to Save the Children nutrition centers at an alarming rate, though.

Crops had failed because of “low and erractic rainfall” according to the United Nations. Families were running out of their usual food supply and were starting to resort to using wild fruits to survive.

Fact-finding missions sent by the UN into parts of Eastern Equatoria confirmed the increasing levels of hunger. It could get much worse too. The upcoming “lean season” between harvests is generally when food supply is at its lowest.

At its Kapoeta nutrition center during January, Save the Children saw 114 infants with severe malnutrition and another 210 children with more moderate malnutrition. Severely malnourished children are given a nutritious peanut paste called Plumpy’nut.

Without the right nutrition infants can suffer lasting physical and mental damage or death. Having enough stock of a food like Plumpy’Nut is essential to humanitarian aid operations. For no long-term solution to ending hunger or building peace can be found with malnourished and stunted children.

Save the Children is also responding to another hunger emergency in South Sudan. Cattle raids in Jonglei, the largest state in South Sudan, have killed or displaced thousands of people who are in need of aid.

These cattle raids in Jonglei took place in Akobo County and are the latest in a series of internal conflicts within the state.

Save the Children is providing aid in Akobo East. This is an area that struggles with food security. Helen Mould of Save the Children points out that the internal conflict has escalated deadly malnutrition in this area. People fleeing violence in Akobo West head toward the east. Mould says, “Host communities are sharing food stocks, but this is adding pressure on an already stressed situation. As a coping mechanism it appears many children are eating just one meal a day and families are relying on wild fruits for their food.”

The effect of this violence drives communities deeper into hunger. Displaced farmers, for instance, will not be able to plant crops in 2013.

The humanitarian tragedy continues. There is such poverty in South Sudan so there is little resistance to shocks such as drought or even flooding. When you add the conflict, often over scarce resources, you add another dimension driving the hunger crisis. South Sudan desperately needs food and peace.

Save the Children has a crisis fund set up to save lives in South Sudan.

Article first published as Saving the Children in South Sudan on Blogcritics.

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Runner Gives Holiday Gift of Plumpy’Nut to Starving Children

A mother attends to her severely malnourished child at an inpatient feeding centre in Mao, Chad. Plumpy’Nut is used to treat this potentially deadly condition (UNICEF Chad/2011/ Esteve)

Elizabeth Paff, a College of Mount St. Joseph (Ohio) student, yesterday finished two weeks of running to raise donations of close to 600 meals of Plumpy’Nut for starving children. Plumpy’Nut is a peanut paste used to feed small children who suffer severe malnutrition and need life-saving intervention.

The donations were sent to Edesia, a non-profit organization that produces Plumpy’Nut and is making the food currently for malnourished children in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Chad.

Heidi Reed, the Communications Manager for Edesia, says, “We are so grateful for Elizabeth Paff for keeping up the fight, the awareness, and the funding to help save the lives of severely malnourished children. Every dollar raised brings us closer to a world where more children are given a chance at life.”

For every minute Paff ran over the last 2 weeks a donation was made equivalent to the cost of 1 package of Plumpy’nut (33 cents). For the last couple of runs the donation size was increased to 1 dollar for each minute run. Paff completed a 47 minute run on Friday adding to the total reported on the Cincinnati Enquirer web site earlier in the day.

Paff is a member of the Leadership Pathways program at the Mount and graduated from Oak Hills High School in Cincinnati. She also has forthcoming publications related to global hunger and has been quoted in the Buffalo News.

Readers are encouraged to send matching donations as a holiday gift to Edesia at www.edesiaglobal.org. Even a donation of one dollar can buy 3 meals of Plumpy’Nut.

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Running to Save Children from Deadly Malnutrition

A mother attends to her severely malnourished child at an inpatient feeding centre in Mao, Chad. Plumpy'Nut is used to treat this potentially deadly condition (UNICEF Chad/2011/ Esteve)

A mother attends to her severely malnourished child at an inpatient feeding centre in Mao, Chad. Plumpy’Nut is used to treat this potentially deadly condition (UNICEF Chad/2011/ Esteve)

Recently, I wrote about how you can raise money to fight global hunger by running and using the Charity Miles app. My fellow writer and runner, Elizabeth Paff, is joining in on this mission with a slightly different spin.

Elizabeth (Biz) is going to run and raise money for a food called Plumpy’Nut that saves the lives of starving children around the world. For every minute Biz runs through December 14, I will make a donation to Edesia, a non-profit organization that produces the Plumpy’Nut.

Each donation will buy a Plumpy’Nut meal (about 33 cents) which consists of a peanut paste fortified with crucial nutrients for children under the age of five. Without these nutrients small children can suffer lasting physical and mental damage.

Plumpy’Nut (as well as its variations like Plumpy’Sup) are currently being used in emergencies such as the conflicts in Syria, South Sudan, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Plumpy’Nut, which comes in a packet, is a food that can be easily distributed in these dangerous areas as it requires no refrigeration or preparation. In crisis areas there is a race against time to reach the hungry and especially the smallest children as they are the most vulnerable.

When the massive famine and drought struck East Africa last year it was Plumpy’Nut that saved many lives. When famine threatened the Sahel region of Africa this year Plumpy’Nut was again called into action. Edesia, which was recently featured on New England’s Chronicle TV show, produces Plumpy’Nut for aid groups like the World Food Programme, UNICEF, and others to use in the field.

Biz is a member of the Leadership Pathways program at the College of Mount St. Joseph, and is an activist fighting hunger. She will log her miles at Mount St. Joseph’s indoor track. I hope others will sponsor her running too and make the donations to Edesia as I am. This will make an inspired holiday gift. I am already counting her runs both Tuesday and Wednesday of 40 minutes each to the tally. So please join in.

Visit Edesia’s website.

Article first published as Running to Save Children from Deadly Malnutrition on Blogcritics.

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Ithaca’s Food for Thought Takes on Global Hunger

Amanda Riggio, former Food For Thought member and Ithaca College student, conceived an event, “Rise Up for Rice,” where students could gather together and answer trivia questions at freerice.com to help eradicate world hunger. (Food for Thought photo)

New York is full of great history and heroes. During the fall of 1947, for example, the Friendship Train rolled through the state collecting food for the hungry in war-torn Europe.

Today, not far from where the Friendship Train made its New York stops, students at Ithaca College are also collecting donations to feed the hungry. One way they accomplish this is through an online trivia game called FreeRice.

Every time you answer a question correctly playing FreeRice, ten grains of rice are donated to the UN World Food Programme. And the Friendship Train is one of the questions in this game!

Ithaca College has a dedicated organization to fighting world hunger called Food for Thought. Back in 2010 I wrote a story on Elizabeth Stoltz who founded this hunger-fighting group.

Stoltz had set up an event for the Ithaca community called the Walk for Plumpy’nut, a fundraiser to provide life-saving food to malnourished children. This event has continued ever since collecting thousands of dollars each year to purchase Plumpy’nut. She was also running a magazine called Plumpy’nut Press.

Since that time Food for Thought has expanded its reach in feeding the hungry. In addition to the annual Walk for Plumpy’nut it has started the Rise up for Rice challenge using the FreeRice game. Two of Food for Thought’s current officers, Lethia McFarland and Lindsey Smith, recently shared some of the groups accomplishments in the following interview.

Who developed the idea of the Rise Up For Rice Challenge?

Amanda Riggio, former Food For Thought member and Ithaca College student, conceived an event, “Rise Up for Rice,” where students could gather together and answer trivia questions at freerice.com to help eradicate world hunger.

How many players participated in the Rise Up For Rice Challenge this year?

Unfortunately, we cannot measure the number people participated this year, given that many people did so remotely, but we did raise 43,590 grains of rice collectively.

Did you have a tournament involving different teams too?

We did not. Everyone who participated logged in under the same account “riseupforrice,” so that we could best track the impact.

How many grains of rice did you raise this year?

43,590 grains (over four times the amount that we raised last year!)

How did you promote the event on campus?

We actively promoted the event via social media, including Facebook and Twitter. To supplement this, we also designed small pamphlets and distributed them throughout campus.

Do you have members participating from outside the campus?

It could have been a possibility, but unfortunately, we could not measure that affirmatively.

Can people still take part in Rise up For Rice all year long?

Yes! We encourage students to play on the day of Rise up for Rice, but the account is open all year long.

Rise up for Rice was preceded by another event on campus called Walk for Plumpy’nut? How did that event go this year?

At our 6th Annual Walk for Plumpy’nut on Sunday, October 7th, we welcomed 109 people and walked together in solidarity to fight childhood hunger. We were able to raise over $4,100 dollars, as well as obtain 40 sponsors for this year’s walk. All of the proceeds will go directly to Concern Worldwide to buy Plumpy’nut for distribution in therapeutic feeding centers across Ethiopia. Plumpy’nut, a ready-to-use therapeutic food, will be used to help treat severely malnourished children. Overall, we hosted a successful event, thanks to the gracious support of the Ithaca community.

Article first published as Ithaca’s Food for Thought Takes on Global Hunger on Blogcritics.

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