Tag Archives: College of Mount. St. Joseph

College Runner Fights World Hunger While Making Comeback From Injury

Last Christmas Amanda Shelby received a precious gift. She got to run again. It was only a jog around her neighborhood, but it was not the distance that mattered. She was back doing what she loves. Just months before she was so close to losing all of that.

Read the full article at The Huffington Post

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Service Learning to Develop Leaders Against Hunger

With Congress planning further cuts to food stamps, hunger in America is likely to escalate. Overseas, wars and disasters in Syria, the Philippines, Central African Republic and elsewhere are creating massive hunger emergencies. Rebuilding these countries and their food systems will take years.

We need leadership from our communities and government to fight hunger. We need leadership for the long haul.

Read the full article at The Huffington Post.

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Feeding America Charity Miler Writing Play on Hemingway

MSJ student Matthew Kohlmorgen has been doing Charity Miles to raise donations for Feeding America, the largest domestic hunger relief organization. Here is a sample of some of the workouts he has tweeted.

MSJ student Matthew Kohlmorgen has been doing Charity Miles to raise donations for Feeding America, the largest domestic hunger relief organization. Here is a sample of some of the workouts he has tweeted.

Matthew Kohlmorgen of the College of Mount St. Joseph (MSJ) is using both his writing talent and athletic ability. As a member of the MSJ Charity Miles team he runs to help Feeding America.

Charity Miles is a free app you download onto your smartphone. For every mile you run, walk or bike a donation is made to a charity of your choice, paid for by a corporate sponsorship pool. Through December 17 Lifeway Foods is matching all Charity Miles with a donation to the UN World Food Programme, the leading hunger relief agency in the typhoon-devastated Philippines.

Kohlmorgen is one of the top Charity Milers at MSJ. He is a senior English major and a published writer. In this interview Kohlmorgen discusses Charity Miles and a special project he is working on about Ernest Hemingway.

Q. Which type of workout do you use for Charity Miles?

A. When I use the concrete as my gym I love to just run and forget about everything. Running is a great way to relieve stress and the best part about using Charity Miles is that something so simple as running can make such a difference to people. Lately I have been doing a lot of yoga on account of not having much time to run.

Q. What are some of the charities that you are helping?

A. My favorite is “FEEDING AMERICA” because I have a soft spot for the domestic American family who is suffering, this is something that allows me to feel that I helped put food on a hungry family’s table, just because I go for a run.

Q. Do you have a personal connection with any of the Charity Miles causes?

A. I have been very fortunate and blessed in my life. I don’t know what it is like to go to bed hungry or what the feeling of having to swallow pride and go to a community centre for food feels like. I want to do everything I can to make sure that I give what I have in my life back, I can’t be selfish and forget about those who don’t have all the benefits that I have. If anyone is even remotely charity minded then there is no excuse to not have Charity Miles on your smart phone (an appliance that almost everyone has).

Q. As an English major you are working on a special project involving Ernest Hemingway? Can you tell us about that?

A. Yes! The project has had so much developmental hurdles because there is always that pressure to say something new, but how do you say something new about a man who has been so intimately studied by just about every single respectable institution? If we are talking about a Hemingway book that analyzes him as a writer, human being, or journalist then there is absolutely nothing new to say. However, in fiction there is so much to approach because that gives an audience of fans and non-fans a chance to see him from a different lens and having him opposite one of his contemporaries who has just as much intellectual and creative gravity would be fascinating-that is why I chose Orson Welles vs all the others in his generation. To see Hemingway argue with someone who wasn’t weaker than him, who could drink as much as him, and who could possibly outwit him is something I would like to see myself. Luckily, no one has made such a play so as a fan that is why I am pursuing this. Finally, I have always thought that Hemingway deserved a medium that approached him with a new perspective, that perspective being something that shows everything he was. The suicidal and mentally ill individual, the warm and caring father, the drunken misogynist, the close friend and argumentative writer. There are whole books dedicated to every topic I just mentioned, but nothing that has tackled the entirety of his complex personality. Fiction allows me to do that, and I needed someone who would be able to contend with him in all those areas, to me that was Orson Welles.

Q. Did Hemingway happen to spend time in the Philippines?

A. little bit of time yes, as far as I can determine he really didn’t do much profound thinking there. I hate to admit it but I had to really research (aka Google) that one. He was there in 1941, right after his marriage to famed war correspondent Martha Gellhorn. He spent time in the famous Manila hotel drinking, bull fighting, and boxing, pretty conventional behavior for the Hem.

Q. Can someone follow your Charity Miles workouts?

A. Of course! My Twitter account is Twitter.com/MKohlmorgen.

Bill, it as always has been a pleasure and congrats on being a blogger for the HuffPost!

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Food and Education Can Change the World

The UN Development Goals Class at the College of Mount St. Joseph (Dr. Jim Bodle)

The UN Development Goals Class at the College of Mount St. Joseph (Dr. Jim Bodle)

Last month I spoke to a unique class at the College of Mount St. Joseph in Ohio, one dedicated to ending hunger and poverty through the UN Development Goals. The class had attended Ban Ki-moon’s Youth Day presentation at the General Assembly.

As I prepared for the class a surprise came to me via twitter! It was a letter from a child in Mali, a country in Africa that has suffered through conflict and drought. The UN World Food Programme (WFP), which is providing school meals in Mali, forwarded a translation of the letter:

Hello papa et maman. After 11 months of occupation in North Mali by armed bandits we’re today on the path to school. Our parents are poor and tired.

Thank you WFP who gave us food so we could work hard in school. We always count on God and you. With WFP it’s okay. The school in Barize thanks you.

These school meals take on even more urgency in Mali with recent findings that show three out of every four households in the northern part of the country suffer from hunger. Both WFP and Catholic Relief Services are providing food for schoolchildren in Mali. Funding though is always an issue.

Food and education for children is something that clearly does not get enough attention, yet it’s one of our most important pathways to peace.

Ban Ki-moon told the Youth Day audience in August about his experiences growing up in war-time Korea. When it rained there were no classes because those were held outdoors. The school buildings had been destroyed during the fighting.

The Secretary General said the Korean children were hungry for food, but also hungry for knowledge. “It’s not only bread and butter” he said, “you need to have knowledge and education.” Getting children food and education is a top priority worldwide.

What better example than South Korea? During and after the war food was provided to children through the United Nations, CARE and other organizations. The U.S. Food for Peace program was founded after the Korean War. Millions of Korean children received school meals through Food for Peace.

History provides us even more advice. It was October 1st, 1947 when Secretary of State George Marshall said, “Hunger and insecurity are the worst enemies of peace.” He knew that peace after World War II stood no chance unless the enemy of hunger was defeated. Europe’s recovery was only possible under a foundation of food. School meals were a huge part of this recovery. That is a lesson we need to remember today.

It was a great opportunity to speak to the UN Development Goals class about food and education for children. Everyone in the class even received a Red Cup which is the World Food Programme’s symbol of school meals.

The school meals mean a lot to every country, from the United States to Yemen. The United States has its own national school lunch program, building upon years of effort. Now the U.S. Congress ironically is trying to undo that by eliminating some free school meals as part of its food stamp cuts.

That is why it’s so important that people advocate for what should be a basic right for children: school meals. The UN Development Goals class, with its emphasis on service learning, is well-equipped to carry on this message.

Next year Yemen will be starting their own national school lunch program with the help of WFP, a potential major turning point for a country mired in conflict and poverty.

Erin Koepke of the World Food Program USA said to me, “I love how there is a class dedicated to the Millennium Development Goals. If only all colleges and universities had a similar class.” I agree.

originally published at the Huffington Post

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College Students Hear Message of Hope from UN Chief

United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon holding the famous red cup which symbolizes the movement to provide all children worldwide with school meals. Mount St. Joseph students listed to presentations both at the United Nations and on campus about the importance of school meals in ending hunger and poverty (photo courtesy of the UN World Food Program)

United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon holding the famous red cup which symbolizes the movement to provide all children worldwide with school meals. Mount St. Joseph students listed to presentations both at the United Nations and on campus about the importance of school meals in ending hunger and poverty (photo courtesy of the UN World Food Program)

Last month College of Mount St. Joseph students traveled to the United Nations in New York. Their mission was to learn about the UN Development goals to end world hunger and poverty.

The students attended a presentation by UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon. The Secretary General talked about bread and butter. Not the appetizer kind. What he meant was how children around the globe needed food, but also education.

The Secretary General told the story about growing up during the Korean War. Schools were destroyed during the fighting and children attended class outdoors, under shade of trees. When it rained there was no class.

The Secretary General said how he and other children were hungry for food, but also for knowledge. “It’s not only bread and butter” he said, “you need to have knowledge and education.” Getting children an education is a top priority worldwide.

The Mount students, upon returning to campus, learned more about the importance of food and education for children. The story of war-time Korea further illustrated this point as former Cincinnati resident, Major Charles Arnold, led a UN civil assistance team that fed Korean refugee children. Without this food, the children would have suffered severe malnutrition.

The Charity CARE, with support from the U.S. Food for Peace program, provided millions of Korean children with school feeding over the decade following the war. This was a key strategy to fighting malnutrition and boosting school enrollment and learning.

Today, the United Nations World Food Program spearheads a global effort to provide all children with school meals. It’s called The Fill the Red Cup Campaign.

MSJ students received red cups from the World Food Program USA last week as a symbol of this school feeding movement. They also listened to historic messages from General Dwight Eisenhower, who spoke in 1948 at the United Nations Crusade for Children. Ike emphasized how starving children, scrapping for food, could not grow up to be apostles of peace. Food aid is essential now as it was after World War II.

The Mount campus currently fundraises for UN school feeding programs and Feeding America through its Charity Miles team. The UN class is planning to continue to spread Ban Ki-Moon’s message of hope, food and education for all.

article originally published at Cincinnati.com

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MSJ Charity Miles Interviews

msjI have conducted interviews with several members of the Mount St. Joseph University Charity Miles team (MountMiles). These interviews have been published online at Huffington Post, Examiner and some have appeared in the Cincinnati Enquirer print edition.

I have compiled a list of the published interviews and other features here with links. It’s a great way to learn about Charity Miles, how it works, and the people that make it go. This information can also serve as a model for other schools in setting up their own Charity Miles programs.

Interview: Tristan Chaput on Charity Miles for College

Interview with Aaron Bloemer- the student leader for Charity Miles

Interview: LeeAnne Reinert, Charity Miler at Mount St. Joseph

Huffington Post feature on Cross Country Runner Amanda Shelby

College student Kelly Burger featured at Huffington Post on 30-hour famine

Interview: Matthew Kohlmorgen about Charity Miles and Hemingway

MSJ runner Kelleen Scott logs charity miles to fight cancer

Fox19 segment on Mount Miles event

College Student Becca Heizer Excels at Charity Miles and Service Learning

MSJ Impact Group to Host Charity Miles Walkathon

MSJ Student Leader Making an Impact

MSJ Student Inspired by Charity Miles

Cincinnati Enquirer Good News Profile on Aaron Bloemer

Runner gives holiday gift of Plumpy’Nut to starving children

Cincinnati Authors Class Helps Feed the Hungry with Charity Miles

Linking Hunger Fighting and Service Learning

Small College Captured Spirit of the Marshall Plan

Author William Lambers on Charity Miles

MSJ Athletes Pursue National Title in Charity Miles

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Interview: LeeAnne Reinert, Charity Miler at Mount St. Joseph

LeeAnne Reinert is the President of the College of Mount St. Joseph Student Nurse Association. While starting her career in the medical field, LeeAnne has also been fundraising for many charitable causes.

She is a member of the Mount’s Charity Miles team (MountMiles), organized by the Campus Activities Board. Charity Miles is a free app you download onto your smartphone that allows you to raise money for Feeding America, Autism Speaks, Stand Up To Cancer, the World Food Program and many other charities.

When you start your workout, you select which organization to sponsor. Then for each mile you run, walk or bike, a donation is made to the charity of your choice, paid out of a sponsorship pool.

LeeAnne recently took time to discuss Charity Miles.

Tell us about your first experience with Charity Miles, as part of extra credit for a class.

I was very excited when I was told about the Charity Miles opportunity for my Cincinnati Authors Literature class. It was perfectly timed with Lent and connected my two Lenten goals into one since my Lenten goals were to make healthier choices and dedicate my time to a worthy cause. Running for good causes gave me all the motivation I needed to lace up my running shoes and head to the track.

I was also excited that if I completed the required number of miles by the end of the semester I would not have to write the final paper for my Lit class. (What college student doesn’t love getting out of writing a paper?) This opportunity ended up being a blessing that allowed me to focus on my nursing classes and raise my grades that ultimately helped me earn a 4.0 last semester!

How many Charity Miles have you run so far?

During school I ran about 30 miles. Since the beginning of summer vacation I have run about 40 miles. (The heat and work have slowed me down.)

What are some of the charities that you are helping?

The two charities that I run for the most are Stand Up To Cancer and Wounded Warriors Project.

Do you have a personal connection with any of the Charity Miles causes?

The Wounded Warriors Project has a special place in my heart. My father, mother, and brother are all in the military (or are retired from it) so all my life I have been surrounded by the dedicated men and women of our armed forces. Running for them makes me feel like I am doing my part to say thank you for their sacrifices. They received the care they more than earn as they continue to put themselves in harm’s way.

Stand Up To Cancer is another organization that is near and dear to me. I have had too many friends and family members fight or lose the battle to cancer. As a future nurse, cancer is going to surround me and knowing that the miles I run could help that fight always makes me want to push a little harder during each workout.

Can someone follow your Charity Miles workouts?

All of my Facebook friends can see my see my miles. My hope though is that my friends will be inspired to follow my lead and participate as well. I always know that some of my fellow Charity Miles runners/walkers will like the post and I always try to return the favor to them.

originally published at Cincinnati.com

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